Opening The Art of Seeing Whales

.Entry begun on Tuesday, July 24, at 5 am

It’s 5 am and I’ve been awake since 4, so I may as well begin this entry. I came home from the trip with sinus congestion, and the sulfa drug my doctor gave me was not able to eliminate it, so I went on an antibiotic yesterday.

The opening reception for The Art of Seeing Whales was scheduled from 6 to 8 on the evening of Tuesday, July 1. After people gathered for drinks and light appetizers near the whale skeletons hanging high above the Jacobs Family Gallery, I gave a gallery talk in the exhibition space. We had an excellent crowd that was very attentive, and it was a pleasure to discuss these works in such a beautifully installed gallery. This was the first time I had been wired for two different audio-video recordings while giving a talk. One camera was from the local public access television station. The other was with David Shaerf, a professor from Oakland University near Detroit, whom I had previously met at a Moby-Dick Marathon when be was beginning a project of documenting the influence of Moby-Dick on contemporary culture. On this visit to New Bedford he had arranged to do interviews with a number of my MSCP colleagues. In the Midwest he had already scheduled interviews with Matt Kish in Dayton, Ohio, and Beth Schultz in Lawrence, Kansas.

Still from David Shaerf's video of gallery talk

Still from David Shaerf’s video of gallery talk

Because I had been very busy immediately before and after the voyage on the Morgan, I did not have a prepared text for this gallery talk. And, in general, when giving a gallery talk or an illustrated lecture with images, I prefer to speak from the images themselves rather than from a text I have written earlier. I did write out some notes for the talk on the front and back of a page of my legal pad, including the names of the three Inuit artists that I wanted to say correctly. In addition to highlighting the exhibition itself, I had decided to begin with a brief summary of the MSCP in New Bedford, beginning with the first visit Beth Schultz and I made in the summer of 1998. This provided a context for integrating the Schultz and Archive artworks along with those from the Museum’s historical collection. It also allowed me to address the current cultural moment in New Bedford in the context of our twice-annual visits during the last fifteen years. At one point I found myself saying that this was one of the happiest days of my life—speaking at this exhibition, in this gallery, in this Whaling Museum, a few days after having sailed into New Bedford on the Charles W. Morgan.   This is probably not something I would have said if I had written out a prepared speech.

Still from David Scaerf’s video during the gallery talk

Still from David Shaerf’s video during the gallery talk

Christina had suggested that I give the talk standing on the steps in the corner of the room housing the Holistic Harmony and Infant and Child sections. That would allow the audience to see me–and me to see more of the audience and exhibition–as I spoke. Nathaniel Philbrick, by quoting the passage about the “women of New Bedford” in his keynote address on Saturday, gave me a perfect segue into the introductory panel for the show with Piercefield’s Women of New Bedford directly above it. Even in this crowded room, the audience could easily see the contrast between Van de Velde’s 1617 Dutch oil painting and Xiaoguang Qiao’s 2009 paper cut out inside the entry of the show, in themselves a world of difference in how the whale has been perceived, and represented, across space and time.

Still from David Scaerf’s video during the gallery talk

Still from David Shaerf’s video during the gallery talk

One of the biggest questions about curating this show was how well it would work, visually and imaginatively, to mix historical paintings from the Whaling Museum with the work of contemporary Moby-Dick artists form the Schultz and Archive collections. I was delighted in the way this had worked out on the long wall on which Christina and her staff had installed the lives of the whalers in “The Perils in Between” followed by the fate of the whale in “Cutting the Whale.”  The visual rhythm between the grand historical portraits in oil on canvas in ornate frames and the contemporary works in mixed media on paper was fresh and illuminating. The installation flowed together in one continuous run from the Bradford history painting of a whale ship setting out, through the red velvet portrait of Captain Francis F. Smith processing the whale, to Milloff’s and Kish’s contemporary take on the cutting-in.

Jim Campomar looking in display case with "Cutting-In" section behind him

Jim Campomar looking in display case with “Cutting-In” section behind him

At the end of the room from which I was speaking, Zellig’s large drawing of the whale’s eye (Will He Perish?) held the attention as fully as it had when my students and I first saw it at the student exhibition in Rockford, Illinois, in 1997. The “Mother and Infant” section, augmented by the mother and infant whales in Piercefield’s Women of New Bedford, spoke strongly to our relation with whales as fellow mammals that had been one of the recurrent themes of the papers delivered at the Sympoisum. Lee Heald, the program officer of the Whaling Museum who had so strongly encouraged the early collaborative projects that resulted in the MSCP, attended the opening. After my talk she told me something I had not known about the portrait of Louisa Seabury Cushman and her child. The mother in the portrait is wearing tokens of mourning, suggesting that this painting may have been a memento mori after the child had died, which would explain some of the special emotion it carries. Peggi Medieros had mentioned Louisa Seabury Cushman in one of her essays in the special issue of the Standard-Times, noting that all three of her children had died as infants, leaving her and her whaling-captain husband childless.

The eye of Zellig’s whale drawing audience in still from Shaerf’s video

Eyes of the audience drawn to the eye of Zellig’s whale in still from Shaerf’s video

After speaking about the “Cutting the Whale” and the “Mother and Infant” sections, pivoting on Klauba’s painting of the nursing whales deep in the water under the carnage, it was somewhat of a relief to move on to the positive celebration of whales—and our relation to them—in Celia Smith’s Moby-Dick; in The Great Hunter by Nanogak, Kaodloak, and Kanayok; and in contemporary works by Aileen Callahan, Richard Ellis, Kathleen Piercefield, and Vanessa Hodgkinson. I had spoken somewhat longer than I had planned, but there were still many questions and much discussion after the talk was over.

Images of the whale by Ellis, Piercefield, Hodgkinson, and Callahan

Images of the whale by Ellis, Piercefield, Hodgkinson, and Callahan

Among those who had driven down for show today was a film producer from OceansLIVE in Provincetown, She liked how the subject of this show meshed with the video production that they would soon be making when the Morgan was scheduled to sail out among the whales at Stellwagen Bank off of Cape Cod. Jeff Levine, a collector of Moby-Dick art from Worcester, also drove down for the opening.  He came because of his interest in the subject, but also because he has a rich trove of rare materials pertaining to the Huston-Bradbury collaboration on the 1956 film that Jim Campomar from Argentina was very eager to see. They made arrangements for Jim to see the collection in which, among other things, he was thrilled to see unpublished original drawings that Huston and Bradbury each had made of the White Whale.

Jeff Levine (left) and Jim Campomar speaking with Wyn Keley in still from Shaerf viseo

Jeff Levine (left) and Jim Campomar speaking with Wyn Kelley in still from Shaerf viseo

The rest of the week passed quickly, as the Symposium continued up until I returned my rental car to the Providence airport. I was delighted when Molly Herron, one of the four composers in their early thirties who had premiered a Moby-Dick Oratorio in Brooklyn in February, arrived in time for the Symposium session that I chaired on Wednesday afternoon. I had suggested that the arrival of the Morgan with all its concomitant activities, in addition to seeing the Whaling Museum itself, might be of great interest to her as a reader and composer deeply interested in Moby-Dick, and she had found time to schedule a visit. Shortly before arriving, she had sent me a link with not only the CD but a video recording, the libretto, and the score of the premiere performance in February. I am hoping that future performances of that work might be arranged in New Bedford, and also as part of the programming surrounding the production of Heggie and Scheer’s Moby-Dick in Cincinnati in 2016. I was glad to get a photo of Molly standing beneath the Whaling Museum’s skeletons of the female right whale and its fetus that had been preserved from the remains of a deadly ship strike in the Atlantic Ocean several years ago.

Composer Molly Herron under skeleton of right whale and fetus in Jacobs Family Gallery

Composer Molly Herron under skeleton of right whale and fetus in Jacobs Family Gallery

Before leaving town for the Providence airport, I got a chance to go to Crowell’s Gallery and see the new works that Vanessa Hodgkinson had painted in New Bedford between the arrival of our ship on Wednesday and her flight from Logan Airport on Sunday. Six works hung together on a single wall. The seventh was on an adjacent wall. The sunset (or sunrise) watercolor with the white whale beneath the water (Mocha Dick) was one of my favorites because of the Turnersque rendering of the seascape. I love her image with the whales filling the sails of the ship at the top center below (Catch of the Morgan, reproduced in my “Out of the Cradle” section) because of its ambiguity: the cetacean cargo can either be whales that have been captured or whales that have captured the ship. In other words, you could see them as fast-fish or as loose-fish.

Six new works by Vanessa Hodgkinson at Crowell’s Gallery, July 3, 2014

Six new works by Vanessa Hodgkinson at Crowell’s Gallery, July 3, 2014

The one painting on the adjacent wall had no similar ambiguity. Vanessa had filled its sea with reproductions of an image that nineteenth-whalers used in their log books for whales that had been seen and chased but not captured. These were all loose fish.  This is confirmed by the title of the work, Those Who Got Away II (which I learned three weeks after visiting the gallery).  Its companion piece, Those Who Got Away I, is just as beautifully rendered, and satisfying to the imagination.  All seven of the new works are in watercolor and ink on paper

The seventh new Hodgkinson work at Crowell’s Gallery

Vanesa Hodgkinson, Those Who Got Away II, 2014

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Vanessa Hodgkinson, Those Who Got Away I, 2014

Vanessa Hodgkinson, Those Who Got Away I, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the way from Crowell’s Gallery to my rental car, I took my GoPro camera to The Art of Seeing Whales exhibition to see if I could capture good images of the works in the show without too much distortion from its fish-eye lens. I never really found out. After methodically going going hrough each section of the show, and uploading the file back home to see what I had, I found that the GoPro, like the iPhone, has a function that allows you to make the equivalent of a “selfie.” Instead of a filming a leisurely survey of every nuance of the show, I had accidentally filmed a close-up fish-eye of myself as I thought I was filming the show. I will have to try this again when I return to the Moby-Dick Marathon in January, after which the exhibition is scheduled to close, and be more careful of my settings. The image below gives a pretty good view of the part of the show that was behind me, but it’s not what I had in mind.

Unintentional “selfie” from the GoPro video in which I thought I was filming the show

Unintentional “selfie” from the GoPro video in which I thought I was filming the show

That last visit to the gallery, however, was not entirely lost. A grandmother had come into the gallery with her grandson (who you can see in the accidental selfie immediately above). Upon entering the room, he had paid close attention to the image of the cutting-in scene just inside the door. Then, at the other end of the room, he had literally embraced Klauba’s The Pod. The boy’s eyes were right up next to the image and his hands flat against the wall on either side. I asked his grandmother if I could ask him what he saw in the painting, and she encouraged me to do so. He said he did not want to talk much about the stuff up at the top “where they are hurting the whales,” but he loved the images of the mother and baby whales in the water below. We had hung this painting a little lower than I might have ideally liked, but it was just the right height for the heart of a six-year-old boy.

Klauba’s The Pod in the “Mother and Infant” section

Klauba’s The Pod in the “Mother and Infant” section

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Installing The Art of Seeing Whales

Entry begun as plane takes off from Philadelphia for Cincinnati / Northern Kentucky, Friday, July 4, 6:35 pm

[We were rocking pretty hard when as we landed through gusty winds on the Providence flight into Philadelphia. Though the sky here is now clear and blue with only a few light clouds, this plane was jerking hard from side to side before we got off the ground in Providence.  I know that wind is invisible, but I was surprised to find our takeoff more more jerky than trying to follow the Sirius.  This airplane feels like an Indy car on a dirt track.  I hope that big lumbering guy who squeezed into the cockpit knows what he is doing.]

Last Thursday morning, my feet more steady on the floor after a good night’s sleep, I got up to the Center Street Gallery of the Whaling Museum as soon as I could to see how the installation was going and make any final decisions. How great to be working with Christina, Melanie, Mike, Scott, Sarah, Jordan, and Juliette. This was the morning Melanie came in with the beautifully stenciled title of the show, and she and Scott and Sarah discussed exactly how high to put it over the 1617 Dutch painting and 2009 Chinese cut out that open the show. The font Christina chose is perfect: elegant yet easy to read. 

Exhibition title on opening wall

Exhibition title on opening wall

Mike’s idea of putting the Piercefield’s Women of New Bedford over the introductory wall panel has worked out equally well, though it is a little high and catches a bit of glare.

Melanie Correia with introductory panel and The Women of New Bedford

Melanie Correia with introductory panel and The Women of New Bedford

Several sections of the show were looking good but needed adjustments to make the most of them. The first narrative section, following the rhythm of a typical whaling voyage out of a harbor, into the sea, and back again in its aftermath (subtitled “The Perils in Between”) had one work too many for the available space.  So Christina had reluctantly removed the despondent depiction of a truncated Nantucket sleigh ride, a decision with which I entirely agreed. We would now remove that entry from the text we had drafted for the wall panel. J. S. Ryder’s A Perilous Ride would have to wait for some future ehxibition.

Getting "The Perils in Between" on the wall

Getting “The Perils in Between” on the wall

The next section, subtitled “Cutting the Whale,” was being beautifully hung, all six works popping off the wall and off each other in just the way I hoped they would.  The visceral force the Kish and Christodoulou Ahabs relate equally well to the historical portrait of Captain Francis F. Smith, and the inset scene of the cuttnig-in in his portrait relates extremely well to three more modern cutting-in depictions.

Squaring up the Cutting-In Section

Squaring up the Cutting-In Section

Back in the far corner, Zellig’s Will he Perish? was far from the Dutch and Chinese works at the other end of the gallery, but that made her large whale’s eye staring right back at the viewer even more dramatic and effective. I had not planned it that way, but seeing the eye of the whale right next to our three “Mother and Infant” works is also very powerful. When I first saw the “Mother and Infant” hang I had wondered if Klauba’s The Pod could go above, rather than below, the drawing of the mother and infant right whale from Western Australia (because the Klauba is relatively dark and could be more clearly seen in the higher, brighter light). We tried this change, but the installers felt to it disturbed the balance of the three works in relation to each other, so we returned the Klauba to its original spot.

Mother and Infant section next to Zellig's eye

Mother and Infant section next to Zellig’s eye

            The duo of Celia Smith’s Moby-Dick and The Great Hunter by Nanogak, Kaodloak, and Kanayok in the back at the far left was even better than I had imagined.

The Great Hunter by Nanogak, Kaodloak, and Kanoyok above Mary Smith's Moby-Dick

The Great Hunter by Nanogak, Kaodloak, and Kanoyok above Mary Smith’s Moby-Dick

When I had come in on the day before I took the ferry to Oak Bluff, we had been trying to decide which of the old 17th-century maps depicting whales as monsters would look best in one of the niches next to a window. But that was when Christina had mentioned that the absence of Callahan’s charcoal drawing of the Skin’s Path had been an oversight, not a curatorial decision. We decided that if we did use the Callahan, it would occupy that space very well on its own, which certainly turned out to be the case. After the decision to include it, I wrote a wall label for it under the heading “Seeing the Whale Up Close.”

Aileen Callahan, Skin's Path, charcoal on paper, Elizabeth Schultz Collection, New Bedford Whaling Museum

Aileen Callahan, Skin’s Path, charcoal on paper, Elizabeth Schultz Collection, New Bedford Whaling Museum

The one decision about the next wall between the windows, “Seeing Whales as Inspiration,” was whether to include three or four works. The four we had selected worked well together thematically but they were a little too crowded for this vertical slice of a wall. We reluctantly took out Christodoulou’s Whiteness of the Whale III, creating a lyrical top-down progression from Ellis’s sketch for the White Whale mural, to Piercefield’s From the Headwaters of the Eternities, to Hodgkinson’s Squeeze of the Hand.  All three works remind us of the whale’s ancient history long before humans existed, flourishing in an ecological system from which human mammals have much to learn, and even revere.

 

Top down from Ellis to Piercefield to Hodgkinson

Top down from Ellis to Piercefield, to Hodgkinson

With the major decisions now having been made about the works on the wall, Melanie could now produce the wall texts while Mike was finalizing what went best in the back-to-back eight-foot-long display cases. Everything he had in each of the cases looked very good to me–a constellation of objects from four centuries and four continents in one lovely juxtaposition after another. But Mike is a perfectionist, and this was his final shot at critiquing and tweaking his display.

Mike Dyer contemplating one of two display cases

Mike Dyer contemplating one of two display cases

Mike is a master of mounts and of placement as well as of pictorial content.  I loved watching him raise one piece a little and lower another, move one of them forward and another a little back.  Some of these works now had their “tombstone” labels to help me know what they were,  He asked if I would like to see anything added to either case–which would require removing something already there.  Out of everything currently in the cases, he said one he could most easily spare was the powerful image by Rockwell Kent to which he had opened one volume of the three-volume set published in 1930.

One of the treasures in one of the glass cases

One of the treasures in one of the glass cases

Kish's Fleece and Daggoo in one of the cases

Kish’s Fleece and Daggoo in one of the cases

When Mike asked if we had something worthy of replacing the Rockwell Kent, I immediately thought of the twelve new Matt Kish drawings of the crew of the Pequod I had brought with me from northern Kentucky on Monday (the Melville Society Archive acquisitions for 2014). I brought out the handy little album book in which Kish had presented them.  I slowly paged through one after another so Mike and I could see which, if any, would be suitable additions to the current contents of the case. As soon as we got to Fleece, in which the cook of the Pequod, presents the “whale as a dish” requested by Stubb on a platter, Mike knew it belonged in the case. As we looked through the other drawings, we gravitated to Tashtego, for the contrast of his bright orange color, and Daggoo, for the harmony of its black and blue coloring with that of Fleece. Fleece’s whale and Daggoo’s blood red harpoon spoke well to the spirit and content of the rest of the show, on the walls as well as in the case, and the two fit together perfectly in the space vacated by the Kent. Both visually and symbolically, the two brand new Kishes “nailed” the two display cases in the best possible way. 

The next time I walked up Center Street to the high brick wall of the Museum, I would know that the exhibition up inside those upper windows would be nearly complete..

Outside wall of the Center Street Gallery of the New Bedford Whaling Museum

Outside wall of the Center Street Gallery of the New Bedford Whaling Museum

I was happy to have gotten a photo of the trio who had done most of the heavy lifting, Melanie Correia, Scott Benson, and Sarah Kendall. 

Melanie Correa, Scott Benson, and Sarah Kendall after they had gotten most of the works up on the wall

Melanie Correia, Scott Benson, and Sarah Kendall after they had gotten most of the works up on the wall

[As I am completing the draft of this entry in my journal, our plane from Philadelphia is taxiing into the Cincinnati / Northern Kentucky airport exactly 22 hours later than I was scheduled to arrive from Charlotte the niight before.  I will discuss some of the circumstances surrounding the cancellation of the flight that would have brought through Charlotte in part 6 of this blog.]

 

Getting East

Entry begun Monday, June 23, 8:30 pm

Exultation is not the first word that comes to mind about travel these days. The airplanes that carried me from Cincinnati to Philadelphia and from there to Providence had the smallest seating space I ever remember. In Philadelphia there was barely time to get from one concourse to the next, connected by a shuttle bus, by the time the plane for Providence was supposed to board. I get there just in time but it wasn’t loading. There was an unspecified mechanical problem and no estimate yet about how long it might last. At least that would presumably give my checked luggage time to catch up with my plane, which was a very long distance from where we had landed. The delay lasted only about twenty minutes, and things began to get better. Beginning with the woman who had the window seat to my immediate right, even more confined than my aisle seat.

I love how you meet people traveling you would meet in no other way. Somehow Japan came up as the plane was preparing to taxi and it turns out she and her two teenage sons had spent six weeks backpacking on Japan’s public transportation, seing the sights and sleeping in the cubicle hotels, having such a good time they did not want to come home. Today’s mission was quite different. Her mother in the East is suffering from Alzheimer’s and is being nearly starved to death by the daughter (sister of my seatmate) who had taken her in, it turned out, only to siphon off the mother’s monthly benefit check. A sister in the South, and police in the town where the mother now lives, had agreed that the mother had to be extricated from this intolerable situation, an operation my seatmate, with the local police on call, was to perform tomorrow morning, taking Mom to Sis in Florida before flying back to the city near the Great Lakes where she works two jobs totaling 60 hours a week, both sons now having left the empty nest.

During the two flights I read about half of The Charles W. Morgan by John F. Levitt, first published in 1973 and updated by Mystic Seaport staff in 2013. This book is answering some of my questions and telling me many things entirely new. The cabin boy on this ship usually did sleep near the officers’ quarters, whereas the cook was sometimes assigned to the forecastle. The relatively spacious quarters of the “captain’s day room” in the Morgan has something to do with the fact that five different captains had wives living aboard with them, one of whom gave birth during the course of the voyage, the new son replacing the captain’s sixteen-year-old son from a previous marriage who had recently died in a fall from the mast. Yes, there were floggings on this ship, even after the practice was outlawed, and more than one near mutiny.

Dick Russell, Eye of the Whale, 2001

Dick Russell, Eye of the Whale, 2001

It might not be so surprising that Melville knew about the long history of the Makah Indians hunting whales along the Olympic Peninsula near Ozette, because the Morgan spent considerable time hunting in those very waters in the 1840s. In 1862, the Morgan joined the whale ships that had begun to send boats into the “shallow waters” of Scammon’s Bay in Baja California “to hunt down female whales and their calves.” One female fought back so strongly to protect her young that she “stove” two of the Morgan’s whale boats. In the 1850s, Charles Melville Scammon, for whom the lagoon was named, had been the first whaling captain to send armed whale boats into the gray whale lagoons for (usually) easy kills. He eventually had a change of heart and in the 1870s published an illustrated treatise on the species (Marine Mammals of the North-Western Coast of North America) that is still a classic (see Dick Russell’s Eye of the Whale).

Fairfield Inn, New Bedford

Fairfield Inn, New Bedford

 Things got better for me as soon as I saw the deep blue of the Atlantic Ocean through the window of the plane.  Ultramarine is the word that came to my mind and my eye at the same time. My checked bag in Providence got to the carousel almost as soon as I did. The Enterprise rental car agents were courteous and efficient. The air outdoors was fresh and breezy. Driving to New Bedford I saw two tug boats near the new bridge that skirts Providence, and the traffic was smooth the rest of the way on I-95. A huge new sign for the New Bedford Whaling Museum crowns the hill as you approach the city, a harpoon, rather than an arrow, pointing to the right. MacArthur Drive, the street immediately in front of my waterfront hotel was newly paved, no doubt for the arrival of the Morgan. I was a little before check-in time at the Fairfield Inn, but they were still able to give me a room with a view of the harbor.

Images laid out to hang, Center Stteet Gallery, June 23

Images laid out to hang, Center Street Gallery, June 23

After checking in, I went to the Whaling Museum, where Melanie and other staff members were installing our Art of Seeing Whales exhibition. It was wonderful to see the Dutch and Chinese whales ready to go up on the wall right inside the entry, and before I left they were up. All walls were lined with works waiting to be hung, more or less in the order in which they will be mounted. There was some confusion about certain frames and mounts that took a while to work out (I walked up the hill to the flat file in our Archive in the Whaling Museum’s Research Library to get some matts that had been used when some of our Matt Kishes went to Washington, DC), but I am entirely confident that Christina and her team will have the exhibition close to its final form by the time Mike Dyer, Vanessa Hodgkinson, and I get off the ship two evenings from now, if we sail according to schedule.  When Christina arrived from a meeting, we went looking for Skin’s Path, Aileen Callahan’s charcoal drawing of the whale’s skin, which will fit just right in a niche where a space had opened up because works that had been chosen turned out to be more suitable for display cases than mounted on the wall.

Cork Wine and Tapas, formerly New England Boilder Repair and Welding

Cork Wine and Tapas, formerly New England Boilder Repair and Welding

I saw Vanessa at Crowell’s Gallery and frame shop, where she had shown her Moby-Dick works in January—and where some of the works for the exhibition at the Museum were currently being framed. Vanessa came over to the exhibition space soon after I went back and helped with some questions about the installation. Christina took Vanessa and me out for a drink and tapas at Cork, one of the many flourishing restaurants and cafés from which one can now choose in New Bedford, a far cry from the situation when we began developing our Archive here a decade ago. Christina and I enjoyed hearing about Vanessa’s plans for her adventure on the Morgan and related projects, and Christina and Vanessa enjoyed the twelve new drawings by Matt Kish that I had brought with me from the Midwest.

After we parted, I had clam chowder up the street at Freestone’s and returned to my hotel to write out and type up this entry. Vanessa will meet me here at 9 am tomorrow to take the ferry to Martha’s Vineyard. Mike Dyer was not at the Whaling Museum today because he is walking from New Bedford to Wood’s Hole before taking the ferry from there, admirable devotion to the spirit, and locomotion, of the era in which the Morgan first sailed.

The Art of Seeing Whales

Entry begun on Saturday, June 21, 5:55 am

Crew hoists sails in June 11 trial run, Stephen Dunn, Hartford Courant

Crew hoists sails in June 11 trial run, Stephen Dunn, Hartford Courant

While I have been getting my affairs in order here at home, the 38th Voyage of the Charles W. Morgan has gotten under way. The Morgan sailed out of New London last Sunday, June 15, one day later than scheduled because of rough water. The photographs are absolutely thrilling, and the twelve-hour transit from City Pier in New London to Fort Adams State Park in Newport, Rhode Island, went without a hitch (except for a sail boat race in Newport that caused the whale ship to cool its heels for half an hour before its first landing). After being towed from its berth in New London by the tugboat Sirius, the Morgan had plenty of opportunity to sail under its own wind power, to the apparent satisfaction of all.

“You can just feel that she is happy and she wants to go and wants to sail again,” deckhand Aaron Gralnik told reporter Johanna Somers of the New London Day. Mystic Seaport historian Glenn Gardinier “was captivated by the way the Morgan took the swell of the Atlantic Ocean for the first time in more than 90 years.” He also “spent time admiring how the shadows on the floors and walls of the ‘blubber room’ rocked back and forth as the Morgan swayed in the sea.” My favorite quote in the account by Somers is this one from Alan Schaeffer, a crew member from Mystic: “Remember, no one who is alive has sailed a ship like this until last week.” How sweet to see the Morgan easing in toward her berth in Newport.

Charles W. Morgan arriving at Newort, June 15.  Sephen Dunn, Hartford Courant

Charles W. Morgan arriving at Newport, June 15. Sephen Dunn, Hartford Courant

Beyond the challenge and thrill of preparing for my own voyage, I had the pleasure of working this week with Christina Connett and Mike Dyer of the New Bedford Whaling Museum to finalize the object list and draft the wall texts for the exhibition we are calling The Art of Seeing Whales. The museum staff will be installing the show on the day I am scheduled to sail into New Bedford on the Morgan, so we had to make all of the major decisions by this weekend. It is a wonderful challenge, and opportunity, to be integrating works from our Melville Society Archive with those of the New Bedford Whaling Museum and its recently acquired Elizabeth Schultz Collection. This enables us to illustrate the human process of “Seeing Whales Across Space and Time”—in the words of our opening section as currently conceived. Mike had the brilliant idea of juxtaposing an iconic Dutch painting by Esais van de Velde (Whale Stranding, 1617) with a newly acquired Chinese paper cut-out by Qiao Xiaoguang (The Story of Moby-Dick, 2010).

Esaias van de Velde, Whale Stranding, 1617, New Bedford Whaling Museum

Esaias van de Velde, Whale Stranding, 1617, New Bedford Whaling Museum

 

Qiao Xiaoguang, The Story of Moby-Dick, 2010, Schultz Collection, New Bedford Whaling Museum

Qiao Xiaoguang, The Story of Moby-Dick, 2010, Schultz Collection, New Bedford Whaling Museum

William Bradford, Clark's Point Lighthouse, Ne3w Bedford, New Bedford Whaling Museum

William Bradford, Clark’s Point Lighthouse, New Bedford, New Bedford Whaling Museum

Our next grouping, “Seeing the Whale: The Perils in Between,” evokes the course of a voyage through images of the departure from the home port, the action at sea, and the human aftermath. William Bradford’s Clark’s Point Light, New Bedford, could be any whale ship heading out in hope of a prosperous voyage. Peter Martin’s Melville the Man #1 (2013) imagines the author of Moby-Dick returning to New Bedford late in life and remembering the book about the White Whale he had written forty years later.

Peter Martin, Melville the Man # 1, 2013, Melville Society Archive

Peter Martin, Melville the Man # 1, 2013, Melville Society Archive

Our next grouping, “Seeing the Whale: Cutting In,” includes Isaac Sheffield’s Portrait of Captain Franklin F. Smith (posted earlier in “Stowing Down and Scanning the Horizon”) and Mark Milloff’s Stripping the Whale (posted under “Shawn, Vali, and Alison”). It will also include Matt Kish’s original drawing of the cutting-in scene he reproduced as page 295 of Moby-Dick in Pictures: One Drawing for Every Page (2010).

Matt Kish, drawing for pate 295 of Moby-Dick in Pictures, 2010, Melville Society Archives

Matt Kish, drawing for pate 295 of Moby-Dick in Pictures, 2010, Melville Society Archives

Our next grouping, “Seeing the Whale: Mother and Infant,” is inspired by the moment in Moby-Dick in which Ishmael, amidst the carnage of the “Grand Armada” chapter, looks deep into the water and sees mother and infant whales absorbed in their life-sustaining activity. George Klauba’s The Pod in one of several surprising images with which we will illustrate this theme.

George Klauba, The Pod, 2005, New Bedford Whaling Musewum

George Klauba, The Pod, 2005, New Bedford Whaling Museum

Our next two groupings will juxtapose images of whales as “Monster and Myth” with those of a more “Holistic Harmony.” One of the latter, entirely new to me, is The Great Hunter by the Inuit artists Nanogak, Kaodloak, and Kanayok.

Nanogak, Kaodloak, and Kanayok, The Great Hunter, 1995, New Bedford Whaling Museum

Nanogak, Kaodloak, and Kanayok, The Great Hunter, 1995, New Bedford Whaling Museum

Our last grouping, “Whales as Inspiration,” brings together several works which invite the viewer to “Model thyself after the whale!” (in Ishmael’s words from the “Blanket” chapter). Vanessa Hodgkinson’s Squeeze of the Hand (posted earlier in “A Little Lower Layer’) is one of these. So is Kathleen Piercefield’s From the Headwaters of the Eternities, inspired by Ishmael’s observation in chapter 105 of Moby-Dick that whales were swimming through the world’s waters long before humans existed.

Kathleen Piercefield, From the Haert of the Eternities, 2004, Schultz Collection, New Bedford Whaling Museum

Kathleen Piercefield, From the Headwaters of the Eternities, 2004, Schultz Collection, New Bedford Whaling Museum

It is a great pleasure to envision such a collection of images coming together. It will be even more wonderful to see them on the walls. I will meet with Christina and her assistant Melanie Correia next Monday afternoon in the gallery after flying from Cincinnati to Providence via Philadelphia and driving a rental car to New Bedford. With our proposed works actually in the space, we will see how everything fits and make any necessary adjustments. The next day I will be off on my whale ship adventure while they are beginning to install the show—in addition to everything else they and the entire town are doing to prepare for the arrival of the Charles W. Morgan.